According to an article written for “Parenting.com”, titled “New Parents 8 Most Asked Questions”, Dr. William Sears, a leading Pediatrics author writes that the #8 most asked questions is…

How do I know when to start feeding my baby solids, and which foods should I start with?”

The short story is, there is no exact time or milestone to start your baby with solids.  In fact, most leading experts tend to agree that most babies get all of the nutrition they need in their first six month from breast milk or formula.  That said, 6 to 9 months seems to be the sweet spot for starting your baby on solids.  Here are a few general guidelines for determining the when…

  1. Make sure you baby can sit upright and hold up his or her head on their own
  2. Has mastered their tongue and lip movement
  3. Still seems hungry after a full day feeding of breastmilk or formula

Now that we have determined that it is okay to start your baby on solids, here are a couple tips to get them into the routine.

  1. Feed your baby at normal adult mealtimes.  The sooner you get them into a big boy/girl routine, the better.
  2. Start out with two servings per day for the first month or so.  Start with lunch and dinner.  Gradually add in the breakfast feeding.
  3. Wash your baby’s hands well before mealtime.  Your baby will likely do a lot of exploring with their food.  Keep them clean.

Now the biggest decision.  What types of foods should we start with?

Dr. Sears also recommends, “Whenever you start your child on solids, begin with foods that are the least allergenic and the closest to breast milk and formula in taste and consistency, such as mashed bananas or rice cereal.”    Here are a couple of tips…

  1. Months 4-8: Pureed vegetables and fruits.  Sweet potatoes, green beans, carrots, bananas and rice cereal.
  2. Months 9-12:  Introduced mashed, chopped, or ground finger foods.  Try crackers, soft fruits and vegetables and some ground soft meats.
  3. Stay away from: Cow’s milk, citrus, honey and any food that may constitute a choking hazard such as globs of peanut butter, nuts and dried fruits such as raisins.

Always remember, if you have any questions or concerns, always call your pediatrician or pediatricians nurse.  Next question up: “Are they supposed to have green poop from their solids?” Happy parenting!